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SUNN O))) - White2

Format: CD
Label & Cat.Number: Southern Lord SUNN31
Release Year: 2004
Note: the following album to White1 goes even further into new directions, using more light suspended guitar drones and also concrete noises, as well as Indian chants... a terrific album, our favourite SUNN O))) at that time, BACK IN STOCK!
Price (incl. 19% VAT): €13.00


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Nachdem White 1 schon beraus erfolgreich war und zu diversen Touren der Gruppe um STEPHEN OMALLEY gefhrt hat, hier mit WHITE 2 der Nachfolger ein Album das den Sound der Gruppe erweitert, wenn auch lichtere Gitarrenschwebeklnge auftauchen,
konkrete Gerusche eingeblendet werden und am Ende beim genialen DECAY2[NIHILS MAW] indische chants zu einem akustischen Pndamonium verarbeitet. Grandioses Album, das die Genregrenzen gleich mehrfach berschreitet !!

You get three epics here. First is "HELL-O)))-WEEN": the sound of leviathan riffs issuing from subwhere, the worksong of tarry entities crawling through the cold veins of the universe's dark matter. This is the cut that cleaves closest to SUNN O)))'s initial mission as living-homage to legendary slow-drone goners Earth: it starts slow and then...slows...down....some......more. It is a fantastic grounder and a great party-ender. Keep it close. Next is "bassAliens," a sprawling, buzzing, squeaking headcase cross-section composed of unfound space, tolling guitars and blackfeedback violence. Everything decays before your ears. Fans of Coil, Keiji Haino, Non and Godspeed You! Black Emperor will soilldrawers on this one. Final number is the stunner, the breakthrough hit: "Decay2 (NIHILS' MAW)," in which the SUNN O))) darklight shifts to guest vocalist Attila Csihar, just as he falls into the pit of a beast. Or did he jump? Hard to tell: against a swirling, droning miasmic backdrop, Attila's majestic chanting and throat-singing suggests devotion as much as the eternal sadness of a sun-less mind. If you've still got some human in you, this will move you. Darkness knows no borders. [JAY BABCOCK/ARTHUR MAGAZINE]